We need to understand how to provide trauma-informed care

I’m sharing a link to this article titled “We need to understand how to provide trauma-informed care.”  It’s a very simple, short, well-written piece dealing with problems treating children who have a trauma history, in the care services. I think that everything the author writes about children could also be applied to adults with a history of trauma who are being provided with care services.

I would add to the information in the article something I’ve been thinking about a lot.  Childhood trauma is not only something that affects “other people,” children and adults who present to agencies for care.  It affects many people who may appear to be high functioning and may not present to agencies.  Some of those who work in the care services may have been drawn to their professions — drawn to wanting to help others — because of their own histories of childhood trauma, whether or not they have dealt with that history fully.  Others who provide services may have experienced childhood trauma that they are unaware of.  Service providers who are avoiding traumatized parts of themselves may have difficulty dealing appropriately with behaviours reflecting trauma in the people they treat.

Too little is still understood about how a history of trauma can impact people’s behaviour and health.  And too little is still understood about childhood trauma, period.  Let’s keep spreading the word; let’s help people understand.  Let’s raise ourselves up.

Yours,

Annie.

 

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. I firmly believe in a link between trauma and disease.

    Like

    1. Thank you for reading. Yes, the stress created by trauma does not do a body good…. Best wishes. A.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes! Spread the good word about trauma informed care, or as I like to call it: emotional and behavioral intelligence. Let’s change the question from: What’s wrong with you!? to What HAPPENED to you? Compassionate questions heal.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, so true: compassionate questions heal. Thank you so much for reading, and for commenting 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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